About your Search

20130401
20130430
SHOW
Today 35
Book TV 23
( more )
STATION
SFGTV2 160
SFGTV 140
MSNBCW 118
CNNW 104
KGO (ABC) 104
FOXNEWSW 103
KPIX (CBS) 103
KQED (PBS) 84
KNTV (NBC) 82
KTVU (FOX) 82
CSPAN2 67
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 60
CSPAN 56
FBC 47
KRCB (PBS) 46
CURRENT 33
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1564
Spanish 16
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,580 (some duplicates have been removed)
for this city and for everybody in it. so, mayor brown, thank you very much, to you, to your friends, to all of your supporters for being here. happy, african american history month. and more than a month, let's continue celebrating, let's keep doing this. this is a great enjoyment for all of us. thank you for being here. thank you for giving the insight for what you two share and not too shab by to have willie brown and now it is time to acknowledge and recognize our special guests stand and be recognized. david chiu? are you here or are they still in session? we want to acknowledge district five london breed, and district ten, supervisor, representing my hood, cohen. san francisco first african american city administrator naomi kelley. the mayor's office deputy chief of staff, for public safety. paul henderson. >> san francisco treasurer, sisneros. >> san francisco port commissioner kimberly brandon. commissioners south east city, toya moses. >> oakland port commissioner, brian parker. director of workforce development office of economic workforce department rhonda simmons and president ja
? willie brown does that. [ applause ] i'm so glad you are applauding. it gives me time to get water. if i were younger, hipper, i would breakout into a rap right now to talk about his virtues and his life and career. if i were to do that, it might sound something like this. you all ready ? when you think of willie brown you want no other, he's the one you count as your brother, what else can i say? i can't say no more. through the streets of san francisco makes you want to sing. when you think of willie brown we like no other. he's the kind of dude that you like as your brother. i say he's the kind of dude that you want as your brother. he's the kind of dude that you want as your brother. [ applause ] but since i'm an old dude, i'm not going to do that because that would seem unseemly. what i do say is when this is all said and done, willie would seem to be an individual who em bodies the classic american story success of invention and reinvention. born of talent, skill, determination, brilliance, lots of plain old hard work. and the ability to take one's god given talent, fashion it, sh
on which the president stood, including those of mayor brown who without question paved the way for president obama and countness others. so today we celebrate all that he is and all that he has done and all that he continues to do. the san francisco mayor's office of neighborhood services truly appreciates the generous support it has received during this 2013 black history month and so right now, i would like to take a moment and acknowledge our sponsors for today's event, san francisco firefighter local 798. the san francisco police association. wells fargo bank. comcast. gen renaissance foundation, at&t and paradigm assets management company and thank you all for helping us out today. we also would like to thank marcus shelby of the orchestra who will be blessing us with his talents today. >> now, the san francisco mayor's office of neighborhood services works tirelessly as a liaison between san francisco neighborhoods and city government to make sure that the voice of the neighborhood is heard and if problems and concerns are handled effectively and respectfully. and now, r
you think of willie brown we like no other. he's the kind of dude that you like as your brother. i say he's the kind of dude that you want as your brother. he's the kind of dude that you want as your brother. [ applause ] but since i'm an old dude, i'm not going to do that because that would seem unseemly. what i do say is when this is all said and done, willie would seem to be an individual who em bodies the classic american story success of invention and reinvention. born of talent, skill, determination, brilliance, lots of plain old hard work. and the ability to take one's god given talent, fashion it, shape it, mold it into something quite remarkable and remarkably effective and enduring. willie brown is a game changer. thank you, willie, for all your work, talents, brilliance, heart, your and forgiving a damn. thank you. [ applause ] on that note, i believe i should bring mayor brown to the stage. is that correct? ladies and gentlemen, mayor willie brown. [ applause ] >> that was remarkable. but then again you are a vocalist. mr. mayor, kristin, vernal, vernal was rather rese
and fashion icon, the one and the only the honorable willie l. brown junior. [ applause ] growing in the area, his accomplishments and contributions to the world at large and public service were not lost on me and it is really been a dream come true for me to grow up and get to know him professionally and personally. my father and willie were acquaintances and fraternity brothers. >> when he was elected the first african american mayor i was right up there front and center in 1996 and channel five was out there reporting and they included me in the news coverage and interviewed me and i was historical and crying and emotional and the camera lingered on my black power fist. and fast forward for when i was in washington, d.c. when i was there for barack obama first inauguration and there i went with my fist again more tears flowing and i was not the only one thinking about the shoulders on which the president stood, including those of mayor brown who without question paved the way for president obama and countness others. so today we celebrate all that he is and all that he has done and all tha
>>> governor jerry brown is promoting california to the world's largest emerging market on the trade mission from china. we will get an update from john myers from shanghai. >>> the state continues fighting to regain control of its beleaguered prison after losing another round in court. >>> lawmakers are moving forward to reduce gun violence. >>> plus, sacramento basketball fans jump through more hoops to keep from the kings from leaving town. >>> and the exploratorium coming up next. captioning by vitac, underwritten by fireman's fund >>> good evening. i'm joshua johnson of kqed news. welcome to "this week in northern california." governor brown is continuing the trade mission in china this weekend. he signed agreements between trade between china than california and help one of the polluting nations to improve air quality. he signed for a major development near jack london square. he promoted high speed rail. today, the governor presided over the reopening of california's trade and investment office in shanghai after ten years of it being closed. i spoke with john myer
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions .>> brown: as families of victims of the newtown shooting looked on, congress moved one step closer to a vote on a comprehensive guns bill. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest from capitol hill as senators kick off an extended period of debate over gun legislation. >> brown: then, medicare and social security face changes in the president's new budget. we debate the potential impact. >> woodruff: education correspondent john merrow reports on a rise in high school graduation rates, but the numbers raise questions and educators search for new ways to inspire kids to succeed. >> for kids to believe school is going to lead them somewhere you have to have really strong pathways to adult success, so some could lead the college, some could lead to really solid job training opportunities that lead to a job. >> brown: we look at a clinical trial designed to stud premature baes, t that allegedly failed to disclose risks of death and blindness. >> woodruff: ray suarez
jerry brown will measure this in the long term, not short-term and what kind of economic activity will increase between china and california. >> john, what does china have that california wants and vice versa? >> what china has is it has money to invest. obviously this is a country that is a world power and fared better in the economic downturns than most countries around the world. there is a large growing middle class in china that has money. if you are jerry brown, you want it in two forms. you want large money for the deal we talked about in oakland and you want consumerism. you want them to buy california products. >> he is good on staying on message and staying away from politicking and pomp and ceremony. how has he dealt with that among chinese delegates? >> he has done well with the pomp and circumstance. that is not a jerry brown strong suit. he disdains the trappings of office, usually. he seems to have enjoyed himself having a meeting with the premier of china in mid week. of course, all of the other officials he talked to. as far as issues that maybe others think he sh
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: the massive manhunt has ended for the two brothers believed to be behind the boston marathon bombings. one was killed earlier this morning, the second was taken into custody by police late today in a suburb of the city. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we detail the violent chase to bring the suspects to justice, as swat teams cordon off wide swaths of the city and surrounding towns to capture 19-year-old dzokhar tsarnaev. >> brown: we explore what's known so far about the brothers suspected in the deadly attack. >> suarez: we examine how investigators are trying to figure out whether the brothers acted alone or were part of a larger terrorist organization. >> brown: and we look at how technology allowed police and the public to work together in identifying the suspects. >> suarez: plus, we get the perspective of mark shields and david brooks on terror's return to u.s. soil and the rest of the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."
legislation. now, debate begins in earnest. but any final vote could take weeks. >> brown: still to come on the newshour: taking on social security and medicare; a rise in high school graduation rates; questions about a clinical trial involving infants; the challenge of keeping political power; and the story of a heroic wartime priest. first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a bipartisan group of senators wrapped up work today on the major elements of an immigration reform bill. that came after they agreed on a new farm worker program and visas for high-tech workers. the broader bill aims to improve border security and put 11 million people on a path to citizenship. it could be introduced on tuesday, once senate staffers complete drafts of the legislation. a wide swath of severe weather has moved eastward, already blamed for killing at least two people. the system stretched all the way from texas to michigan and brought everything from tornadoes to ice and snow. at least one large funnel cloud ripped through eastern mississippi today. authorities report
brown weighs the costs of overhauling the california environmental quality act. >>> and john myers reports on the governor's hopes of partnering with china in the fight against climate change. >> it is not just commerce that is moving through china to the west, it is air pollution and greenhouse gasses. >> coming up next. captioning by vitac, underwritten by fireman's fund >>> good evening. i'm joshua johnson. welcome to "this week in northern california." the manhunt is over for a suspect accused of the attack on the boston marathon. police have arrested dzhokhar tsarnaev in a boston suburb. meanwhile, a boy from contra costa county is recovering from the bombing. a family of aaron hearn said he could be released from the hospital soon. >>> there is plenty to discuss. joining us are paul rogers, environmental writer for the san jose news. jaxon van derbeken, reporter for the san francisco chronicle. and emil guillermo, a blogger for the asian-american legal defense. welcome. immigration in congress is getting attention these days on the farms and the sill valley. both rely on immi
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: north korea threatened again to strike the united states with nuclear weapons and moved a missile to its eastern coastline. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the latest provocation from pyongya and the reactio in the u.s. and elsewhere. >> brown: then, we examine possible links between a white supremacist prison gang and recent murders of law enforcement officials. >> woodruff: we get the details on new research showing the soaring price tag for treating dementia now topping the cost of cancer and heart disease. >> brown: from the african nation of kenya: kira kay reports on the religious divide in the port city of mombasa. >> the salvation army is a christian congregation, nestled in the heart of a predominantly muslim city. their faith had never been an issue, but that changed in august last year. >> woodruff: and we talk with the supreme court's first female justice, sandra day o'connor about the court's storied history as told in her new book: "out
woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we examine the military alliance between the u.s. and south korea, amid new worries over the north's nuclear weapons capabilities. >> woodruff: then, we get the latest from venezuela, where voters are preparing to choose a successor to the late president, hugo chavez. >> brown: taxes are due monday, that's certain. what's not clear are prospects for any meaningful tax reform. we debate some options on the table. >> woodruff: hari sreenivasan has the story of aereo-- a new internet t.v. service and the backlash from traditional broadcasters. >> theres millions and millions of dollars this in the:s that the broadcast networks have-- receive in licensing fees from cable companies. they want aereo's pay in the same way. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and we remember jonathan winters-- the comedian who mastered improvisation and brought laughter to generations of fans. >> i think comedy and whether i think it's the rarest thing-- i'm sure others hopefully would agree-- that l
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: a massive explosion at a fertilizer plant devastates a small texas town, leaving entire blocks near the blast in ruins. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest from west, texas where the death toll is uncertain, scores are injured and the frantic search for survivors continues. >> i walked through the blast area, i searched some houses earlier tonight-- massive, just like iraq, just like the murrah building in oklahoma city. >> brown: then, the f.b.i. released photos of two suspects in the boston bombings. we update the investigation, as the president and first lady attend a prayer service in the city to mourn the victims and offer words of hope. >> even when our heart aches, we summon the strength that maybe we didn't even know we had. and we carry on; we finish the race. >> suarez: hari sreenivasan reports on the increased use of drones here at home, amid growing concerns about privacy and their use down the road. >> brown: a new path to citizenship
evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we debate the options on the table for the u.s. if it's confirmed assad's regime has used sarin in the civil war that's killed more than 70,000 people. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner looks at congress's sudden push to get airlines back on-time after spending cuts caused wide-spread delays. >> brown: in bangladesh, the death toll in this week's tragic collapse of a garment factory has passed 300. ray suarez explores the role of american retailers in keeping workers at their overseas suppliers safe. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and the world of country music lost one of its titans. we remember george jones who died today in nashville. >> ♪ he stopped loving her today >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years
. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we look at the latest figures and assess the impact of new technologies, including robotics, on the modern workforce. >> woodruff: then, hari sreenivasan reports on the struggle faced by millions of syrians: uprooted from their homes, but unable to leave their country. >> they suffer from lack of food. in the winter, there was no heating units-- freezing temperatures with little clothing options, blankets-- all of these are in short supply. >> brown: we examine a major ruling on the morning after pill, as a federal judge ordered the fda to make it available, without prescription, to women and girls of all ages. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with the story of an expose of hidden off-shore bank accounts around the obe. >> the first consequence, i guess, is that a secret world is no longer secret, and it's going to send shivers through this world. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supp
broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the unease over north korea's military intentions topped the agenda today for secretary of state john kerry. he traveled to the region and put the north on notice: don't go too far. the secretary of state arrived in seoul for meetings with south korea's new president park geun- hye and her top aides. and, he again warned north korea's young leader kim jong-un against any new missile launch. >> it is a huge mistake for him to choose to do that because it will further isolate his country >> brown: the north has recently moved as many as five medium- range missiles to its east coast-- missiles that can reach as far away as guam. a possible launch was made more worrisome by parts of a pentagon report that became public yesterday. at a house hearing, colorado republican doug lamborn questioned joint chiefs chairman martin dempsey and read out findings by the d.i.a., the u.s. defense intelligence agency. >> d.i.a. assesses with moderate confidence that north korea currently has nuclear weapons capable
. marcia coyle recaps today's court arguments as the legal world asks, can a gene be patented. >> brown: we get an update on the senate's move toward bipartisan immigration reform with republican senator marco rubio leading the charge this weekend. >> ifill: ray suarez looks at venezuela's contentious presidential election as the opponent asks for a recount. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: 27 runners and thousands more spectators had turned out for the boston marathon today when terror erupted. two bombs exploded, and authorities said two people were killed and more than 50 others were wounded. (sirens). within minutes of the bla
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: reverberations from the bombings in boston continue, as the site of the explosions has become the most complicated crime scene in the city's history. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the investigation into who was behind the attack, which president obama now calls a "terrorist act." >> brown: three people were killed and more than 150 were injured, many critically. hari sreenivasan talks with a trauma doctor who led a team that treated the wounded. >> one of our trauma surgeons ran the marathon and when he finied realized what was happening and came in to operate on some of the patients. >> ifill: and the daily download team looks at social media's role in spreading tragic as well as healing messages. >> brown: then, the supreme court takes up a child custody case that tests the scope of a federal law intended to protect native american families. marcia coyle recaps today's arguments. >> ifill: and a new bipartisan report finds that after 9/1
viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: there were new rumblings from north korea today, as it tried to bolster its latest threats against the u.s. by moving a missile with, quote, "considerable range" to its eastern coast. the announcement of that move came from south korea's defense minister. but he also said that the missile was not capable of reaching the united states. >> ( translated ): as i see, its firing range, it is not aimed at the u.s. mainland. we're closely monitoring north korea. we haven't found any signs of all-out war, but we consider that its provocation is always possible and we are ready for it. >> brown: pyongyang's newest provocation is part of its ongoing rallying cry against joint u.s.-south korea military exercises on the peninsula and a reaction to the u.n. security council's renunciation of the north korea nuclear test in february. state television broadcast north korea's latest threat against the u.s. >> ( translated ): we will cope with the u.s. nuclear threat with a merciless nuclear attack. and we will face the infiltration with a justified all-out-war
. >> thank you for having me. good night. >> brown: we'll have more on this still developing story later in the program. still to come on the newshour, genetic research and the law; the senate tackles immigration reform; and venezuela elects a new president. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: at least 55 people were killed in iraq today in a string of coordinated bombings and other attacks. scores of others were wounded. explosions rang out from baghdad and fallujah to kirkuk and tikrit. the force of the blasts reduced city blocks to rubble, caused chaos in the streets and left bystanders bewildered. >> what have those innocent people done to deserve this? lives of innocent people don't mean anything? we are only asking for security and safety. is this safe? no electricity, no cars, they are targeting everything, even people. everything is targeted. why? why are they doing that? >> sreenivasan: the violence came less than a week before iraqis hold local elections, their first vote since u.s. troops withdrew in 2011. there was no immediate claim
,203. for the week, the dow shed one tenth of a percent. the nasdaq lost nearly 2%. >> brown: and we take a closer look at today's numbers and some key longer-term trends in the job market, with lisa lynch, dean of the heller school for social policy and management at brandeis university. she's a former chief economist at the labor department. and andrew mcafee, principal research scientist at the center for digital business at m.i.t.'s sloan school of business and co-author of "race against the machine." lisa lynch, positive numbers but much less than hoped for, and even expected, right. what do you see here? >> well, it was, you know, frankly a miserable report. we had jobs coming in at less than half of what people had expected. and while there was growth in important sectors like construction, the health-care sector, accounting, we did not see the employment increase in manufacturing, it decreased a little bit. and there were big decreases in the retail sector. >> brown: just to stay with you, whether you look at sectors or other factors, does anything stand out or jump out at you as telling w
would take this opportunity to celebrate an icon of san francisco. the brown twin sisters have been with us for many decades. mary is here today, she's here in celebration and memory of her sister as we all are and we want to take this opportunity to use the arbor day to have a cedar tree, a tree that will grow taller than mary or i. it will grow to be a hundred feet tall. it will be a tree that will be celebrated here in san francisco for generations to come and we thought it would be not only appropriate, but we thought it would be our honor by planting this tree in recognition of vivian and her wonderful contributions to our city. and we are especially blessed with maryann honoring us with her presence. it's not that easy for her to get around these days but she has and continues to be part of an incredible twin sisters. but now she's also missing vivian as much as we are and we felt this would be a proper way to create a celebratory atmosphere on how we miss vivian, how much she meant to us and take this opportunity for arbor day to plant this tree in her name. how is that, mar
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: the brothers suspected in the boston bombings allegedly planned to use their remaining explosives to strike new york city's times square. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the new york plot and discuss what u.s. intelligence knew about tamerlan tsarnaev in the months and years before the attack on boston. >> brown: then, the u.s. believes the syrian government has used chemical weapons. but it needs more conclusive proof before reaching the red line for military intervention. >> woodruff: all of the living men who've ever worked from the oval office gathered in dallas today for the dedication of the george w. bush presidential library. we explore how these libraries shape our understanding of history. >> brown: and we close with a behind-the-scenes look at the lobbying fight over gun control. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,580 (some duplicates have been removed)